Throwback Thursday; Newcastle Earthquake, by Amy Theodore / by Amy Theodore

 source: Newcastle Herald

source: Newcastle Herald

The earthquake that hit Newcastle in 1989 is an event that will forever mark our city.  Rocking the town on Thursday 28th December, the earthquake measured 5.6 on the Richter scale and became one of Australia’s most serious natural disasters, with reports of movement coming in from areas up to 800 kilometres outside the city. As the earthquake struck that day, people could be seen spilling onto the streets, escaping their houses and office buildings as the city shook around them. With an estimated damage bill of up to $4 billion, many historical buildings were lost that day, along with around 35,000 homes, which left around 1000 people displaced. The crumbling of buildings also saw 13 people killed, with another 160 injured. It is believed the quake may have been triggered by the area’s coal mining activities. It is believed that a number of factors contributed to the excessive amount of damage that occurred that day, including the fact that the epicenter of the quake was located just 15km south-west of the city’s CBD and that the age and construction quality of many building’s was not particularly high. In possibly one lucky turn of events, the number of people in the city on that day was lower than usual due to a strike by local bus drivers.

 source: abc.net.au

source: abc.net.au

 source: Newcastle Herald

source: Newcastle Herald