Jayteehazard, chatting with Kian / by Kian West

THERE ARE ONLY SO MANY PLACES TO GO OUT IN NEWCASTLE, SO IF YOU’VE EVER BEEN TO THE ARGYLE HOUSE, KING STREET HOTEL, CAMBRIDGE HOTEL OR GREENROOF, THERE’S A FAIR CHANCE YOU’VE CAUGHT JAYTEEHAZARD ROCKING A SET OF TURNTABLES. NOT ONLY DOES HE HOLD RESIDENCIES AT ALL THESE PLACES, HE’S SMASHED OUT SETS AT SPLENDOUR IN THE GRASS AND THIS THAT, AND HE’S ABOUT TO KILL IT AT ONE DAY SUNDAYS AND NEW YEAR’S EVE AT THE CAMBO. SO WE HAD TO CATCH UP!

Reasonably early one morning, I sat down at Suspension Espresso on Beaumont Street to enjoy a quick coffee and get an update from Jaytee (Jacob Turier to his mum) on the year that’s been and what he’s got planned next…

Photo Credit - Isaac Turier

Photo Credit - Isaac Turier

 

 

The first question I usually ask everyone is – if you were at a house party, how would you describe yourself?

Jaytee: I usually lie. I hate that, as soon as you say ‘DJ’ or something like that, there are just so many follow-up questions, and it’s not as glamorous or interesting as people think. I dread that question – being around people you don’t know and talking about it… [Being a DJ] used to be cool when I first got into it, but now I just say ‘graphic designer’, cause there are no follow-up questions to that. When you say ‘DJ’, you also feel like a bit of a wanker.

Is that also because the market has changed?

Oh yeah, it’s such a lame thing now. I am genuinely embarrassed to be a DJ. Unless I’m around other musos – [but] even other musos, because they actually play an instrument.

Unless they’ve seen what you actually do?

Yeah, unless it’s someone who has a bit more of a grasp on what you do, how broad [it is]. You’ve got heaps of different kinds, like dudes who do weddings, EDM guys, actual turntablists – there’s all these different kinds. The average person just usually thinks of whatever their biggest example of a DJ is, so it could be David Guetta or anyone as a small little glimpse into what a DJ is.

Why don’t you say music producer?

Sometimes I say that. But there are heaps of follow-up questions – I don’t really like talking about myself.

[Here, Jaytee tells me all about his set at Splendour in the Grass, what preparation he made for that and his Hermitude support sets. You can hear the full chat in the podcast recording on our website.]

So when you say you want to play an original live production, do you imagine yourself still being the DJ with a band? What does the future look like in terms of a stage production?

I’ve spent a long time trying to figure that out – how much do I want to change? What am I actually doing? – because it’s weird trying to find the line between whether it’s a DJ set or a live performance. I get very self-conscious if I’m up there with two turntables and I’m playing out of Serato [music software] and using trigger points to my own stuff; I wouldn’t consider that live. I’ve got to get my production up to a point where I would rather play my own track over whatever track just came out that’s my new favourite track, which is really hard. 

Do you consider your work as The Last Kinection [hip-hop group] as live?

I consider Last Kinection definitely live. If one of those guys stops, it doesn’t sound real.

With working on material for the group and having your own stuff, how do you manage your time for both projects?

Around 2014, I hadn’t put anything out in my name since the early 2000s when I was doing more dance stuff.  I left that side of things alone; I just wanted to do beats for other artists and stuff.

You’ve got a few credentials in there.

Yeah. I got a track on the Hilltop Hoods album. I’ve done a lot of stuff for Briggs, got a track on his new project A.B. Original; did some stuff with Coda Conduct, did their whole EP; Funkoars; Urthboy.

Image Credit - Cole Bennetts

Image Credit - Cole Bennetts

 

Who’s left on your to-do list?

I don’t know. The to-do list kind of dried up a bit – I always really wanted to do something for the Hoods, but I didn’t even know they let other people produce, so when I did that I was kind of like, ‘Now what?’

I send off beats to other people. I would always do beats – just listen to them in the car, but always be like, ‘that needs a rapper’.

 Has the market for that changed? That you could now release those beats without having a vocal?

I guess. That whole EDM crowd. But a sound will come in nowadays and it could be the hottest thing, then it gets super played out. They just chew up genres and spit them out. Every genre starts out nice, gets more defined, and then someone dials it up to 12 and it gets super aggressive and it’s all over.

When you aren’t rocking clubs, where do you spend your time?

Doing absolutely nothing.

If someone comes to visit, where do you have to take them?

Probably AA Bar (Argyle House) on a Wednesday. When people from Sydney and Melbourne ask me what’s good, [I tell them] that room gets a good crowd that wants to hear the fresh stuff, asking for songs that came out that week.

I’d probably take them to the beaches, bring them here [Suspension] for a coffee. Few restaurants, best pizza at Napoli – rate that pizza so much – great Mexican place in Carrington, and a new burger place in Merewether, Drift.

 

 

You might have gathered that Jayteehazard is a pretty humble person, but if you want to check out what he’s all about, you can catch him at One Day Sundays’ special Block Party – Newcastle Edition, December 10th at the Cambridge Hotel; or on NYE with the likes of Illy at the Cambo. There are rumours of him playing a special set at This That, plus all those other residencies previously listed. Go find him on social media and keep an eye out for his next release in early 2017.